Lubrication theory: the key to lubricant selection

Lubrication theory: the key to lubricant selection

In specialized operations such as nuclear reactors, it takes the careful application of lubrication theory to choose the right lubricant for the job. In situations with less extreme temperature and pressure conditions, making a selection based on trial and error is...
Lubricants for nuclear reactor systems

Lubricants for nuclear reactor systems

Lubricants for nuclear reactor systems need to be effective at exceptionally high temperature and high pressure, on components that move at considerable speed, under relatively heavy load, and in the presence of radiation. Tribology and machine design Radiation...
Oxidation – The Lubricant’s Nemesis

Oxidation – The Lubricant’s Nemesis

Oxidation is the most common reaction of a lubricant, and thus one of the leading causes of lubricant failure. In most cases, it can’t be prevented, but steps can be taken to increase the active life of the lubricant by slowing down its rate of oxidation. Because...
Choosing a high-temperature lubricant

Choosing a high-temperature lubricant

In choosing a high-temperature lubricant for use in the extreme conditions of a nuclear reactor, three properties need to be considered: viscosity, thermal degradation, and oxidation. For nuclear applications, you need a lubricant that maintains the same consistency...
Molybdenum disulfide dry film lubricant

Molybdenum disulfide dry film lubricant

Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), often referred to as moly, is widely used as a dry film lubricant in a variety of military, aeronautic and nuclear applications. Robust and stable at high temperatures and pressures, and extremely resistant to oxidation, MoS2 complies with...
WHOLESALE RATES

WHOLESALE RATES